Surrealism for Kids by Queensland Art Gallery (Qld Art Gallery and GOMA)

26 May

Surrealism for Kids has been shortlisted for the Children’s Book Council of Australia 2012 awards in the Eve Pownall Information Books category.  It certainly deserves to be there. It also won the Bronze award in the international 2012 IPPY Awards (Independent Publisher Book Awards) for children’s interactive books. A number of important surrealist artists are showcased in this book in minimal, child-friendly text, and captivating art activities are also suggested. The authors from the Qld Art Gallery have devised very appealing tasks and even provide quality photocopiable pages to assist and inspire.

The Qld Art Gallery has also published two other books for children, both brimming with creativity and ideas. Drawing Life for Kids: My Art Journal is the scaffold for a personal journal where short suggestions and engaging background photos impel kids to put their mark on the page. For example, ‘Write a secret note to pass to your friend’ shows a paper aeroplane next to an unfolded and slightly crumpled plane template which is begging to be written on. ‘Draw the messiest spot in the house’ shows a doll’s house with empty rooms waiting to be filled by young artists. The book is structured around some information about artists including Margaret Olley, ‘Home Sweet Home’ and René Magritte, ‘My Imagination’.

Interesting artists are the focus of 21st Century Art for Kids. Australian and other contemporary artists and their work are shown in photos. There is also an activity for each artist. For example, Pierre Bismuth from France likes drawing onto the TV screen; following an actor’s hand or James Bond’s nose, to make a pattern. Children are encouraged, not to draw on the TV, but onto beautiful art (or other) catalogues. These catalogue backgrounds can possibly be the catalyst for ideas.

Upcoming books to look out for will be published with the gallery’s Prada exhibition in July and the 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art in December but the books do stand alone from the exhibitions.

These books could engender a life-long interest in the visual arts. They are aimed at primary school age (or younger) but will also appeal to teens and would be ideal to leave on coffee tables.

 by Joy Lawn, Children’s Literature Consultant

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